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THE EVERETT ADVOCATE
- Friday, March 17, 2017
EXPERT TAX PREPARATION
%RE·V 7D[ 2IÀFH
ROBERT SHOEMAKER R.T.R.P.
I.R.S. Registered Tax Return Preparer
HOURS: Monday, Tuesday, Friday: 9am - 7pm
Saturday: 9am - 5pm;
Closed Wed., Thurs. & Sun.
Call for appointment or walk-in
617-389-0127
2066 Revere Beach Pkwy.
(Rte. 16)
Everett
(Corner Lewis St.)
Near Richie’s Slush
TAX RETURNS
$
49
Fed - State - E File
As Low As
Stewarts Pub
Everett’s only
IRISH PUB
140 Jefferson Ave., Everett
LET’S CELEBRATE
St. Patrick’s Day
Celebrations
March 17
March 18
DJ Leon 8pm - Close
11am - 1am
Serving Corned Beef Dinners
& Sandwiches ALL DAY
KEEP THE
PARTY GOING
~City Council News~
By Brendan Clogston
Council lends a $1.3
million hand to the
School Department
The council voted 9-1 onMon-
day to approve a $1.3 million
transferof fundstotheSchoolDe-
partment inorder tohelpaddress
a$5.3millionbudget shortfall left
by a change in the state’s fund-
ing formula. Only Ward 2 Coun-
cillor StephenSimonelli opposed
the transfer.
Last year thestatechangedthe
way it defines students as being
in poverty or academically dis-
advantaged. While some cities
saw an increase in state funding
under the change, about 15 –
many of them the poorest com-
munities inthestate–sawadras-
tic reduction in aid. Everett was
among those communities, “los-
ing” about 2,000 students con-
sidered poor under the new for-
mula.Theshortfall forcedthedis-
trict to lay off about 96 employ-
ees, though about 50 were re-
hired last fall after Mayor Carlo
DeMaria indicated that the city
wouldbe fillingpositions to help
meet some needs.
Therestof thefinancialgapwill
be met by a $1.8 million Medic-
aid reimbursement the district
expects to receive in June and
money saved by the layoffs still
in effect.
Inclusionary Zoning
delayed again
The council is delaying its vote
on the mayor’s proposed Inclu-
sionaryZoningordinance for two
weeks inorder togathermore in-
formation, despite a prolonged
Committee of the Whole meet-
ing on the proposal two weeks
ago. The council questioned Di-
rector of Planning and Devel-
opment Tony Sousa on the ordi-
nance, which would require de-
velopersbuildingover10units to
make at least 10percent of those
units affordable, at a Committee
of theWholemeetingonMarch3.
Ward 5 Councillor Rosa DiFlo-
rio felt that the discussion at that
meeting was largely compre-
hensive. “This has already been
explained to us,” said DiFlorio. “I
don’t see what other questions
we have that [Sousa] hasn’t an-
swered.”
Councillor-at-Large John Han-
lon, however, felt that the discus-
sion had left him with as many
questions as answers. “There are
some of us, myself included, that
would still like to ask some ques-
tions, because the more I read,
the more I understand, or the
more I don’t understand. I know I
would like to ask some addition-
al questions,”said Hanlon.
Inavoicevote, thecouncil sent
the item to its Legislative Affairs
Committee. The council’s next
opportunity to vote on the or-
dinance will be at the next regu-
lar council meeting on Monday,
March 27.
Angelo’s Logudice and son, Jason of Angelo’s Barber Shop on Nor-
wood St. is known for their traditional style of hair cutting and
grooming for men, women and children. Their business has also
spannedgenerations as Angelo’s father andgrandfather havebeen
cuttinghair aswell. Even their customers have spannedgenerations
as well. Shown with the father and son duo is customer Ed Harney,
73, of Everett who has been a customer for 64 years with the Logu-
dice family dating back to grandfather, barber Gugliermo or affec-
tionately known as “Mr. G” at his shop in East Boston.
Loyalty runs in the
family barbershop