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THE LYNNFIELD ADVOCATE
– Friday, March 17, 2017
Page 10
ty and one another.
Driven largely by “stations,”
guests made their way around
the room and participated in
a variety of activities, such as
creating “love letters” to vet-
erans and refugees, paint-
ing rocks to decorate Market-
Street and dropping off teddy
bears and nonperishable food
items for people in need. Cal-
ifornia Pizza Kitchen donated
refreshments.
Jenn Lupien, one of the lead-
ers of the group, was enthusi-
astic about the high turnout
for the event. “We’re just try-
ing to connect the communi-
ty and spread some kindness,”
Lupien said.
The “One Love” event was
the first for the group, which
was formed earlier this year in
response to a visible increase
in violence and negativity fol-
lowing the U.S. general elec-
tion. In the future they hope to
hold more similar events that
promote kindness and reject
hate. To find out more about
Lynnfield for Love, visit
www.
facebook.com/lynnfield4love.
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VA FUNDS FERTILITY SERVICES
C
ombat wounded Veterans hoping to start a family but
have struggled with infertility now have relief with VA
funded fertility services.Because of the nature of combat,
particularly due to improvised explosive devices, Veterans
have suffered greater rates of spinal cord and genital inju-
ries than in past conflicts.As a result Veterans have been un-
able to conceive naturally.Fertility treatments and adoption
costs are not only costly but in many instances prohibitive.
As a result of recent legislation the VA is required to pay for
assisted reproductive technology such as in vitro fertiliza-
tion and provide compensation for adoption expenses.It is
up to the VA now to quickly put into effect rules and pol-
icies to ensure that this benefit is available to all Veterans
that qualify.While this benefit is new to Veterans it is avail-
able to active-duty service members through the Depart-
ment of Defense.For qualifying combat wounded Veter-
ans this could be a dream come true with the now ability
to start a family.
Thank you for your service.
Shown, from left to right, are (front row) SanjayAurora,TamaraGetchell, Neha Pareek,VirginiaBlanco, Jennifer Lupien, Darlene
Kumar, Tina Bruno, Anthony Bruno, (second row) Jenna Horne, Lauren Rosencranz, Wendy Dixon, Diana Ellis, (third row) Jeff
Lupien, and Diane Courtney.
“ONE LOVE”
| from page 1
For Askew, the decision to
raise money for the Red Cross
in particular is a personal one.
According to the Marines, the
Red Cross is able to provide
lines of communication be-
tween deployed Marines and
their loved ones where tradi-
tional methods of communi-
cation are often fraught by in-
consistencies. Thanks to this vi-
tal service, Askewdecided that
she wanted to “give back” in
some way, and found that the
Marathon was the way to do it.
As a result, she began run-
ning three years ago andhasn’t
stopped since. She often com-
pletesmultiple eight-mile runs
per week, especially in train-
ing for the 26 mile Marathon.
“Running […] was such a pro-
found experience,”Askew said.
“I’mglad I can double down for
the Red Cross and combinemy
passions by doing so.”
Anyone interested in do-
nating to Askew’s cause can
do so by visiting:
www.crow-
drise.com/americanredcross-
boston2017/fundraiser/fran-
cineaskew.
RED CROSS
| from page 4
“They all came up with unique,
original acts. The kids love it
and so do the parents.”
Last Sunday marks the 17th
year the Huckleberry School
has put on the show. Last year’s
theme was about reading and
featured Principal Bemiss as
a bookworm – the year be-
fore that, “Talent in Toyland.”
Sjoberg said that he and Karis
play a large part in the creative
process, but that it couldn’t be
done without the extra volun-
teers. Around 30 volunteer par-
ents also contributed, along
with middle schoolers who
helped with sound and light-
ing, and high schoolers who
acted as chaperones.
VARIETY SHOW
| from page 5