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THE LYNNFIELD ADVOCATE
– Friday, March 17, 2017
Page 11
A Special Invitation
for the Ladies of the Lynnfield Catholic Collaborative
Lenten Tea
Saturday, April 1
12:00 noon
St. Maria Goretti Parish Hall
Scripture… Song… Luncheon Tea
Our Guest Presenter will be Jaymie Stuart Wolfe
Theme: Fill My Cup, Lord
Lent is a time of solemn reflection, reminding us of the suffering of Jesus.
Let us prepare through prayer, listen to Sacred Scripture, and sing songs of compassion.
Luncheon Tea will follow.
Be sure to bring your favorite teacup
RSVP by March 18
Cost: $20
Please make checks payable to St. Maria Goretti and mail them to:
Elizabeth Basile (781-334-3989) at 15 Fernway, Lynnfield
Beverly Merritt (781-334-4799) at 4 Glen Drive, Lynnfield
Seating is limited to 100 people. Reservations are required.
You are welcome to put a table together.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PUBLIC
HOUSING (H 3400)
The House considered a
GOP-sponsored proposal to
require applicants and house-
hold members over the age of
18 to provide a social security
number upon application for
public housing and prohibit
anyone who does not supply
the number from being eligi-
ble for housing.
House 115-44, then ap-
proved a Democratic leader-
ship-sponsored amendment
replacing the Republican pro-
posal with a newone requiring
the state to establish rules and
regulations regarding the dis-
closure and verification of so-
cial security numbers for appli-
cants of public or subsidized
housing.
The new proposal also re-
quires the Depar tment of
Housing and Community De-
velopment to study and sub-
mit a report on the matter of
public housing eligibility by
July 1, 2016. The report would
include the number of appli-
cants andhouseholdmembers
for state-assisted public hous-
ing who would be unable to
access it if required to submit a
social security number on their
application.
Supporters of the new pro-
posal said the earlier one goes
too far and will not solve any
problems. They argued the
new proposal is a thought-
ful and fair approach to this
problem.
Opponents of the new pro-
posal said the earlier proposal
is simple and effective: if you
don’t provide a social security
number, you are not eligible for
public housing. They argued it
is unfair to provide housing to
illegal immigrants.
The roll call vote is on the
amendment to study, rather
than vote directly on requir-
ing a social security number.
(A
“Yes” vote is for the study. A “No”
vote is against the study.)
Rep. Stephan Hay
Was not yet elected
Rep. Bradley Jones
No
Rep. Theodore Speliotis
Yes
Rep. Thomas Walsh
Was not yet elected
PUNISH“SANCTUARY”CIT-
IES AND TOWNS (H 4200)
House 34-124, rejected a Re-
publican-sponsored amend-
ment that would withhold lo-
cal aid fromany cities or towns
that do not enforce federal im-
migration laws. The withhold-
ing would also apply to com-
munities that have established
themselves as “sanctuary” cit-
ies or towns that offer protec-
tion in a variety of ways to il-
legal immigrants.
Amendment suppor ters
said cities and towns that en-
courage law-breaking are
hurting this nation. They ar-
gued the state should do ev-
erything it can to dissuade
those who seek to come here
illegally.
Some opponents said the
amendment is a mean-spir-
ited political stunt and ques-
tioned why supporters would
want to punish students by
taking away local aid from
their schools. Others said the
amendment is unenforceable,
just like a municipality declar-
ing itself a sanctuary city is
nothing but symbolism.
(A “Yes” vote is for cutting off
local aid to sanctuary cities and
towns. A “No” vote is against cut-
ting it off.)
Rep. Stephan Hay
No
Rep. Bradley Jones
Yes
Rep. Theodore Speliotis
No
Rep. Thomas Walsh
No
HOW LONG WAS LAST
WEEK’S SESSION?
Beacon
Hill Roll Call tracks the length
of time that the House and
Senate were in session each
week. Many legislators say
that legislative sessions are
only one aspect of the Leg-
islature’s job and that a lot of
important work is done out-
side of the House and Sen-
ate chambers. They note that
their jobs also involve com-
mittee work, research, constit-
uent work and other matters
that are important to their dis-
tricts. Critics say that the Leg-
islature does not meet regu-
larly or long enough to debate
and vote in public view on the
thousands of pieces of leg-
islation that have been filed.
They note that the infrequen-
cy and brief length of sessions
are misguided and lead to ir-
responsible late night sessions
and a mad rush to act on doz-
ens of bills in the days imme-
diately preceding the end of
an annual session.
During the week of March
6-10, the House met for a total
of 22 minutes and the Senate
met for a total of six minutes.
MON. MARCH 6
House11:03 a.m. to11:13 a.m.
Senate11:05a.m. to11:08a.m.
TUES.MARCH 7
No House session
No Senate session
WED. MARCH 8
No House session
No Senate session
THURS. MARCH 9
House11:03 a.m. to11:15 a.m.
Senate11:08a.m. to11:11a.m.
FRI. MARCH 10
No House session
No Senate session
BobKatzen
welcomes feedbackat
bob@beaconhillrollcall.com
BEACON
| from page 2
zone, skated to the hashmarks
and scored on a nicewrist shot.
Brendan Driscoll finished the
scoring for the Starswith a shot
through traffic from the right
hand circle, giving the Stars a
four-goal lead.
The win was a great team
effort for all the Stars, and the
winwas indicative of how they
played throughout the play-
offs, with Josh Healey, Car-
bone and Sam Curley frus-
trating Danvers throughout
the neutral zone. Brendan Fly-
nn, Chloe Crabtree and De-
scheneaux provided the Stars
with an offensive presence in
front of the net, forecheck-
ing and making it difficult for
Danvers to get the puck out
of their zone. Connor Wright,
Nick Kelter, Scott Crabtree
and Brendan Driscoll provid-
ed strong defense through-
out. Matt Smith anchored the
Stars in goal, and while not
many shots made it through,
Smith ensured that none saw
the back of the net.
Through the playoffs the
Stars outscored their oppo-
nents 16-0, an impressive ac-
complishment to finish the
season strong. Congratula-
tions Stars!
HOCKEY
| from page 8
JFKexplained,“He carriednoth-
ing except two things: a strong
religious faith and a strong de-
sire for liberty. I am glad to say
that all of his great-grandchil-
dren value that inheritance.”
Departure
On the last day of his visit,
President Kennedy received the
“Freedom of the City” award at
Eyre Square in Galway City. In
describingthestrongbondsbe-
tween Ireland and America, he
concluded that “If the day was
clear enough, and if you went
down to the bay you looked
west, and your sight was good
enough, youwould see Boston,
Massachusetts.”Themotorcade
then headed to Shannon Air-
port, where yet another emo-
tional throng had gathered to
bid him farewell. JFK later re-
marked that his visit to Ireland
had been “the happiest four
days”of his life.
Endings
When JFK’s days were cut
short by an assassin’s bullet five
months later, his widow Jac-
queline Kennedy made a re-
quest of the Irish government
that those “Cadets who so im-
pressed the President on his
visit perform the drill again at
his state funeral.”And so,“those
awe-struck, trembling young
men stood inches from the for-
eign dignitaries from over 90
countries and performed their
silent funeral drill”at hismemo-
rial service.
The people of Ireland were
devastated by the young Presi-
dent’s untimely death. Yet, they
could take comfort in having
welcomed their countryman
“home” months earlier. When
leaving, Kennedy had assured
his admirers that he and his en-
tourage“feel ourselves at home
…and not in a strange country,
but feel ourselvesamongneigh-
bors, even thoughwe are sepa-
rated by generations, by time,
and by thousands of miles.”
More than half a century lat-
er, American visitors still feel
that the legacyof JFK’s 1963 vis-
it lives on in Ireland.
Send comments to helenbreen@comcast.net.
HISTORY
| from page 3