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THE SAUGUS ADVOCATE
– Friday, March 17, 2017
Page 12
Sale Dates: Friday, March 17th
to Thursday, March 23rd 2017
We've been Naturally Barrel Curing
our Grey Corned Beef for 70
+
Years!
Meat, A Great Deli,
Groceries and
Fresh Produce...
We Have It All!
McKinnon’s Own – Red or Grey Cured
McKinnon’s Own
Perdue - Oven Stuffer
USDA Select - Family Pack
Oven Ready!
Family Pack - Bone In
Plain
Farmer’s Hen - Cage Free
5 lb. Bag
2 lb. Bag
Yellow
McKinnon’s Own – Grey Cured
Green
POINT-CUT
CORNED
BEEF BRISKET
CORNED PORK
SPARE
RIBS
ROASTER CHICKENS
BONELESS SIRLOIN
STRIP STEAK
STUFFED BONELESS
PORK CHOPS
CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS
PORK TENDERLOIN
LARGE BROWN EGGS
EASTERN
POTATOES
CARROTS TURNIP
CORNED
BEEF
ROUNDS
CABBAGE
Save
$3 lb.
Florida State University
.
“The
ability to analyze, to critically
think, to present information
is really wonderful, and I think
both courses do a great job of
preparing the student for the
rest of their lives.”
About PCSS
With schools in Everett (PCSS
I) and Saugus (PCSS II), Pioneer
Charter School of Science of-
fersa rigorousacademiccurricu-
lumemphasizingmath, science
andanalytical thinkingskillsbal-
ancedby a strong foundation in
the humanities. The school of-
fers extended days/hours and
career-oriented college prepa-
ration. In order to graduate, stu-
dents must pass five math and
five science classes –more than
statestandards–andmust com-
plete 40 hours of community
service. The school has a 195-
day school calendar, extended
days, afterschool tutoring and
“voluntary” Saturday classes for
students who need extra help.
About the Advanced
Placement Program
TheCollegeBoard’sAdvanced
Placement Program
®
(AP
®
) en-
ables willing and academical-
ly prepared students to pur-
sue college-level studies – with
the opportunity to earn college
credit, advanced placement or
both – while still in high school.
Through AP courses in 34 sub-
jects, each culminating in a rig-
orous exam, students learn to
think critically, construct solid
arguments and see many sides
of an issue – skills that prepare
them for college and beyond.
TakingAPcoursesdemonstrates
to college admission officers
that students have sought the
most rigorous curriculum avail-
able to them, and research indi-
cates that students who score a
3 or higher on an AP Exam typ-
ically experience greater aca-
demic success in college and
are more likely to earn a col-
lege degree than non-AP stu-
dents. Each AP teacher’s sylla-
bus is evaluated and approved
by faculty from some of the na-
tion’s leading colleges and uni-
versities, and AP Exams are de-
veloped and scored by college
faculty and experienced AP
teachers. Most four-year colleg-
es and universities in the Unit-
edStatesgrant credit, advanced
placement, or both on the ba-
sis of successful AP Exam scores
– more than 3,800 institutions
worldwide annually receive AP
scores. In the last decade AP
participation and performance
rates have nearly doubled. In
May 2016, 2.6 million students
representing more than 21,000
schools around the world, both
public andnonpublic, tookover
4.7 million AP Exams.
Making it comfortable
An engineering firm will review heating and cooling options
for the proposed combination High School-Middle School
By Mark E. Vogler
S
augus High School Princi-
pal Michael Hashem and
Belmonte Middle School Prin-
cipal Kerry Robbins both dread
certain times of the school year
when students just can’t stand
the heat.
“We had a girls tournament
basketball gamewhen it was up
to100degrees inthegym,”Hash-
em said this week during a sub-
committeemeeting of the town
panel involved with the plan-
ning of the proposed combina-
tionHigh School-Middle School.
Robbins shared her own hor-
ror storyabout aschool building
that gets too hot.
“The third floor is at least 120
degrees in May. It’s horrible,”
she said.
Dominick B. Puniello, a princi-
pal of the engineering consul-
tantshiredtoworkwiththeHigh
School Building Committee,
plans to look at several different
systems and study their cost-ef-
fectiveness and efficiency.
Hashem said some of the op-
tions that Puniello briefed the
subcommittee on this week
were too complicatedand tech-
nical for him to understand.
“As long as there’s a com-
fortable learning environment
throughout the year,” Hashem
said he really didn’t have a pref-
erence.
Partial air conditioning for
parts of the school will be one
of the options studied.
The costs of the various op-
tions could range from $50,000
to $100,000, according to Pu-
niello.
“We’re going to put together
the cost estimates for all of the
options,” Puniello said in an in-
terviewMonday.
“But the one that might cost
more may be better because
it’s more energy efficient. And if
it’s saving a lot of energy, at the
end of 30 years, it may save you
more money,”he said.
PROGRAM
| from page 11
SAUGUS PD INCIDENT & ARRESTS
Saturday, March 4
They travel and fight together
A front desk clerk at the hol-
iday Inn Express called po-
lice to report fight in the front
lobby of the hotel. According
to the report, dispatched of-
ficers arrived to find the two
men “cooling their heels” in
the hotel lobby post-fight,
waiting to take an Uber – to-
gether. An officer waited un-
til the two men left.
Time to grow up, grown-ups!
Grown-ups acting dumb as
police were called for the re-
port of a fight outside Hock-
eytown parking lot on Route
1 south. According to the
repot, officers found two
groups verbally arguing over
an issue when it was discov-
ered that an assault had tak-
en place and the alleged at-
tacker had left the scene – all
over a comment. The person
claiming to be the victim stat-
ed he did not want to press
charges and was uninjured.
Monday, March 6
Balloons and house
alarms don’t mix
A Lawndale Ave. resident
was informed by Saugus
Police and his alarm com-
pany that his house alarm
had been triggered request-
ing the homeowner to come
home and allow police in-
side to investigate. Accord-
ing to the report, officers
arrived on the scene and
found that a balloon had ac-
tivated one of the home’s in-
terior sensors.\
ARRESTS
Wednesday, March 1
Tracy M. Muse
of 18 Sav-
ille St., Saugus was charged
with operating a motor ve-
hicle with license suspend-
ed; unregistered motor vehi-
cle; uninsured motor vehicle;
and a court default warrant.
Thursday, March 2
Brian M. Butler
of 103
Green St., Lynn was charged
with a court default warrant.
Sunday, March 5
Willie L. Bradley
of 1960
Washington St., Boston was
charged with shoplifting by
concealing merchandise,
third offense; and two court
default warrants.
Daniel Mahoney
of 1 Mon-
mouth Sq., East Boston was
charged with three arrest
warrants.