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THE LYNNFIELD ADVOCATE
– Friday, April 21, 2017
Page 7
You are Invited to Our Classes at the Barn!
Gifting, Trusts & Other Tools for Estate 
Planning & Asset Protection
TUESDAY, APRIL 25,1:30-3:00 OR 6:30-8:00 p.m.
Learn ways to protect your home and other assets from nursing home expenses
through proper estate and trust design. Our guest speaker is Ronald R. Kearns,
Registered Nurse, Elder Law Attorney. Ron brings a unique focus to Elder Law,
advising on care needs and developing the Estate and Medicaid Plan based on those
needs. This complimentary class will explore: ♦ Estate planning and asset
preservation. ♦ Long term care and Medicaid planning. ♦ Overview of legal
documents. ♦ Preparing living documents for possible incapacity.
NEW
  “IRA Inheritance Trust” Class  
THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 1:30-3:00 OR 6:30-8:00 p.m.
This Class features Thomas T. Riquier, CFP®, CLU, and Attorney Paul Bernstein.
Thomas T. Riquier, CFP®, Ed Slott Master Elite IRA Advisor Group™ member,
will use Ed Slott’s book, R
etirement Decisions Guide, 125 Ways to Save & Stretch
Your Wealth
, to examine various IRA considerations. You will receive a
complimentary book.
NEXT CLASSES:
TUES, MAY 2 & 9: 2-part Ed Slott IRA, 401(k), 403(b), 457, and Pension Class
WED, MAY 10:
Social Security Class, when to start taking it
Call 978-777-5000 x146 for reservations or register online
Thomas T. Riquier, CFP®, CLU
Member of Ed Slott’s Master Elite IRA Advisor Group™
The Retirement Financial Center
10 Liberty Street, Danvers, MA 01923
978-777-5000
RetirementCtr.com
Securities and Advisory Services offered through United Planners Financial Services. Member: FINRA, SIPC.
The Retirement Financial Center and United Planners are independent companies
An IRA Inheritance Trust will help protect
and control your IRA. ♦ IRAs may be the
largest asset you pass to your beneciaries
income tax-free. ♦ Protect your IRA in a
divorce, lawsuit, creditors, government
claims. ♦ Prevent beneciaries from
squandering the money. ♦ Do not make
any Trust the beneciary of your IRA,
401(k), or 403(b).
HISTORY
| from page 3
THE NORTH SHORE'S HOTTEST NIGHTCLUB!
dine
drink
gather
enjoy
221 Newbury Street, Danvers
For Tickets call (978) 774-7270
or www.breakawaydanvers.com
IN THE MUSIC HALL
Saturday, April 29 - 9 PM
FORTUNE
In The Tavern
Musical BINGO - 9 PM
IN THE MUSIC HALL
Friday, April 28 - 9 PM
11th HOUR BAND
In The Tavern
KARAOKE W/ KIMBA - 9 PM
Every Tuesday: Open Mic hosted by Brian Maes
Bring in your instrument or vocal talents
& performwith Brian and his Band!
Every Wednesday
CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT
In The Tavern
Every Wednesday
COUNTRY LINE DANCINGWITHMICHELLE JACKSON
THE NORTH SHORE'S ENTERTAINMENT HOT SPOT!
Reserve one of our beautiful
function halls, outdoor patio or
music hall for your special
occasion or exclusive event.
Call 978-774-7270
IN THE MUSIC HALL
Friday, April 21 - 9 PM
MOJO SLIM
In The Tavern
KARAOKE W/ KIMBA - 9 PM
In The Tavern
MUSICAL BINGO - 7 PM
IN THE MUSIC HALL
Saturday, April 22 - 9 PM
3 BAND NIGHT
featuring:
BENTWATER * TAP * TAKEOVER
Hudner, is in frail health and
did not speak at the ceremo-
ny. During the festivities Bill
participated in a moving Navy
tradition by placing his dog
tags, along with the small me-
mentoes of others, in a box to
be “welded in place forever in
the ship’s mast.”
Since it is rare for a battleship
to be named for one still liv-
ing, CaptainHudner and fellow
aviator Wilkie were duly feted
with Navy hospitality during
the launchweekend. Bill’s wife,
his daughter and granddaugh-
ter were also present to see
Captain Hudner’s wife, Geor-
gea, christen the ship, adding,
“MayGodbless this ship and all
who sail on her.” To the strains
of “Anchors Aweigh,” confet-
ti “streamed through a biting
wind,” according to a Boston
Globe account, as the celebra-
tion ended.
(Thanks to Wilkie’s friend and
former neighbor, Bill Munroe of
Lynnfield, whoalsoattended the
Hudner launch, for sharing this
story. Send comments to helen-
breen@comcast.net
.
)
Annual report describes ‘shocking
conditions’ of town facilities
By Melanie Higgins
T
he CFAC committee isn’t
mincing words. In a re-
port released earlier this
month, the Capital Facili-
ties Advisory Committee
described the condition of
the town’s capital facilities
as “shocking”.
The report is the result
of a year of the commit-
tee assessing the various
town facilities, including
public safety buildings, li-
brary, town hall, and senior
center. The overwhelming
consensus is that most of
the facilities are outmod-
ed, overcrowded, and inap-
propriate.
Photos taken during the
assessment and provided in
the report reveal crowded
office space and overflow-
ing file cabinets. Some pic-
tures, such as of the police
station, reveal the jail cell
is located right next to the
women’s toilet. In the fire
department, work spaces
are combined, such as the
“kitchen, conference room,
and lounge”. At the town
hall, documents and files
piled high completely ob-
struct the view from the ad-
ministrative assistant’s desk.
As the report points out,
most of the town’s facilities
are decades old and have
not been altered to accom-
modate for growth. The fire
and police buildings have
been around since 1964, for
example. At the town hall,
the current space required
if taking growth into con-
sideration is 17,000 square
feet. The town hall is cur-
rently 10,200 square feet. At
the library, the report calls
for 26,000 square feet in
space. It currently is 14,000
square feet.
The report recommends
entirely new faci l ities in
some circumstances, and
relocating in others. For ex-
ample, the committee rec-
ommends a new library so
that the old one can be re-
purposed for other use, pos-
sibly to add office space for
town hall use. It calls for a
complete overhaul of the
publ ic safety bui ldings,
such as police and fire, and
proposes a recreat ional
space be built to allow for
leisure activities and to ac-
commodate meetings, of
REPORT
| SEE PAGE 8