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THE LYNNFIELD ADVOCATE
– Friday, April 21, 2017
Page 8
PUBLIC SKATING SCHEDULE
12-6 P.M. $7.50
CLOSED
Private Parties
3-6:30 P.M. $5.00
Private Parties
3-11 P.M. $7.50
Admission after 6 p.m. $8.50
12-11 P.M. $7.50
Admission after 6 p.m. $8.50
Inline Skate Rentals $3 - additional Roller skate rentals included in all prices.
Group rates for summer camps - Call Ahead: 781-233-9507
Birthday & Private Parties Available
Located Adjacent to Rite Aid Pharmacy
in Saugus Plaza, South Bound Route 1
MBTA Bus Route 429
BIRTHDAY
PARTIES
$11.50/Person,
min. of 10 kids.
Price includes Adm. +
Roller Skates. Cake, soda,
paper goods, 20 tokens for
birthday person plus 100
Redemption Party
held Tickets
Monday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Tuesday
Wednesday
gift from Roller
World. in one of
our private BP
Rooms for 1/2hour.
and a
Spring!
•Vinyl Siding •Carpentry Work
•Decks •Roofing
•Free Estimates •Fully Licensed
• Fully Insured
“Same name, phone number & address for over half a century.
We must be doing something right!”
www.everettaluminum.com
Now’s the time to schedule
those home improvement
projects you’ve been
dreaming about all winter!
Everett Aluminum
10 Everett Ave., Everett • 617-389-3839
Owned & operated by the Conti family since 1958 • 59 Years!
Centre Farm begins a new chapter with sale, construction
By Melanie Higgins
C
entreFarmwill soonbemov-
ing into the 21st century.
With construction beginning
a few weeks ago, the Town of
Lynnfield took some big steps
to modernize the property,
which dates back to 1785.
Owing to a seasonablywarm
day, Bob Conway and his crew
of CM Conway Construction
began installing a septic sys-
tem to the historic house. The
change is the first of a few to
the centuries-old building,
which still has toilets from the
18th century.
The day before (April 11),
the Board of Selectmen made
the sale of the property offi-
cial with the stroke of a pen.
TheMiglieros, a family in town,
will take over the property on
June 14, 2017.
The sale comes after months
of negotiating with the state
over the terms of the historic
preservation restriction, a set
of rules for altering a proper-
ty deemed “historic.” The Mi-
glieros just recently submit-
ted three additional chang-
es, which are pending approv-
al by the Historical Preserva-
tion Commission. Town Coun-
sel Tom Mullen did not elabo-
rate, but said that these chang-
es would “not be visible from
the street” and that the com-
mission appeared “fairly fine”
with the submission.
“The changes and renova-
tions are going tomake it spec-
tacular again,” said the Board
of Selectmen Chairman at the
time, Phil Crawford. “I think
everyone’s going to be very
pleasedwith the final product.”
“I can’t think of a better sce-
nario than what’s happened
here,” he added.
Looking into the future, the Centre Farm (567 Main Street),
which dates back to 1785, begins a new chapter this year after
its sale to the Migliero family.
which there is competition
for in town.
The report charts a path for
significant improvements in
the town’s capital facilities
over the next 10-20 years.
In order of impor tance i t
asks for a new library, fol-
lowed by public safety build-
ings, followed by repurpos-
ing and maintenance of exist-
ing buildings sometime near
2028. None of the items on
the CFAC’s ‘wish list’ will be
on the upcoming town meet-
ing, as some have mistakenly
believed.
REPORT
| from page 7
REPORT
| SEE PAGE 17