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THE SAUGUS ADVOCATE
– Friday, April 21, 2017
Page 3
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Agenc
Client:
File Na
Locatio
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No. of
ty bills, and hospital bills in an
eco-friendlymanner. Fileswill be
shreddedon-site inamobilepa-
per shredder, and then recycled.
In Massachusetts, hundreds
of thousands of taxpayers’ dol-
lars are spent each year burn-
ing paper and recyclables that
could have been recycled. This
year, theTown is honoringEarth
Daybyencouragingresidents to
shredand recycle thoseperson-
al documents.
“I am proud that the town is
doing itspart to reducewaste in
the community by hosting the
Paper Shredding Event in hon-
or of Earth Day,”Town Manager
Scott C. Crabtree said.
“I encourage residents to
come out and support this
important community event,
whichwill protect sensitivedoc-
uments as well as the environ-
ment,”he said.
Residents are encouraged to
call Lorna Cerbone at 781-231-
4036 with any questions.
Don’t forget Arbor Day
Panetta noted several other
earth-friendly events that aren’t
part of the traditional Earth Day
celebration
“Although the Tree Commit-
tee does this in celebration on
Arbor Day (April 27th), the ac-
tivities, I feel, go hand-in-hand
(with Earth Day),”Panetta said.
Joyce Rodenhiser will have a
treecelebrationonTuesday,May
2ndat theSaugusPublic Library
at 2:30p.m. in the library for sto-
ry, craft, game, yoga, etc.
TheTreeCommitteehas itsan-
nual tree poster contest for all
fifth graders for all four elemen-
tary schools. They will pick the
poster winners and plant a tree
at theirschool intheirhonorafter.
Tree maintenance day is Sat-
urday, May 6th, from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. at the tree farm.
EARTH
| from page 2
make cuts if the Finance Com-
mittee doesn’t recommend ad-
ditional money. The proposed
$29.6 million operating budget
crafted by DeRuosi for the 2018
fiscal year that begins July 1 is
about $1.2 million more than
what Town Manager Scott C.
Crabtree has recommended.
School Committee members
were still hoping that DeRuo-
si can lobby the Finance Com-
mittee to recommend an in-
crease inwhatCrabtreebudget-
ed. And if that fails, theyhope to
lobby Town Meeting members,
whose main task will be to ap-
prove a new budget when they
conveneonMay1 for theAnnu-
al Town Meeting.
“Thisdocument isdesignedto
provide the School Committee
with a viewof the steps needed
tocloseacurrentdeficit,”DeRuo-
si wrote in the two-page bud-
get update.
“It ismy hope it will be used to
generatefurtherdiscussionboth
with the School Committee and
district stakeholders which may
lead to different ideas to reach-
ing fiscal goals,”he said.
How he’ll cut $1.2 million
In addition to closing the Bal-
lard, DeRuosi’s plan identified
these areas where cuts could
be made:
Reduction of Critical Needs
line items. This would result in
$289,303 saved.
Not filling seven retired po-
sitions at the elementary and
high schools and eliminating
an additional elementary po-
sition – which could amount
to a layoff.As a result, class
sizes at several schools could
increase up to 27 students.
Estimated saving through
these reductions would be
$400,000.
The reduction of six para-
professional positions for Spe-
cial Education. This would
achieve an estimated savings
of $98,400 to $114,800.
A reduction in custodial
help by not replacing retiring
personnel. This could save
about $68,500.
The reallocation of a Spe-
cial Education 240 Grant,
which allows for the payment
of Special Education transpor-
tation. The estimated savings
would be $140,000.
“We continue to look at the
number of retiree positions and
trytodecide if it ispossibletonot
replace someor all of theseposi-
tions,”DeRuosi wrote in his plan.
“We have had high level dis-
cussionswith central office staff
and building principals that de-
termined that class sizes would
have to increase in order to cut
intoourdeficit…Throughthese
discussions,wehavedeveloped
aplanto increaseclass sizeat the
elementary as well as shift staff
at the high school in order to
cover for the positions of some
of the retirees not being filled
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