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THE SAUGUS ADVOCATE
– Friday, April 21, 2017
Page 5
(978) 531-5311
www.StonewoodTavernPeabody.com
Spring Entertainment Schedule:
April
21
st
- Diezel
22
nd
- Back to the 80s
28
th
- Joshua Tree
29
th
- World Premiere
May
6
th
- Fast Times
14
th
- Lucky 13
13
th
Wild Side
19
th
- Souled Out Showband
20
th
- Midnight Goggles
26
th
- Brick Park
27
th
- Revolver
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HELOC 2.75 SA.ai 1 4/14/2017 11:17:00 AM
to capture space…You already
haveamodel inthis townwhere
it was housed outside its own
building,”DeRuosi said.
School Committee Chairman
JeannieMeredithsaidsheagreed
withthesuperintendent that the
Ballard was the best choice to
make for closing a school if the
School Department decided to
reduce the number of schools.
Closing the Ballard would have
the least impactonstudentsand
their families, Meredith said.
What’s ahead?
DeRuosi stressed that he is
continuing to explore a mul-
titude of options. “What we’re
looking at is how to close a def-
icit…This is a preliminary plan,”
DeRuosi said.
He noted there are a variety
of ways to reduce educational
spending.Forinstance,SpecialEd-
ucation – a major component of
any School Department budget
– is also fertile ground for reduc-
tions.“I thinkwecouldcomeback
anddeliverthesameserviceswith
six less bodies,”DeRuosi said.
There isalsotheunpredictable
mobilityof personnel.“Between
now and the end of the school
year, there will be people who
either resign or move to anoth-
er school district or retire,” De-
Ruosi said.
DeRuosi highlighted his“next
steps” in a budget update:
Meet with union leader-
ship to discuss the suggested
changes to staffing.
Meet with Belmonte ad-
ministration to finalize staffing
changes and to see if therewill
be additional savings.
Meet with building princi-
pals to review impact of sug-
gested non-retirees and class
size increases.
Meet with FinanceManag-
er to review all numbers and
look for additional cost saving
in FY 18 Line Items.
Meet with FinanceManag-
er to reviewcurrent FY17 bud-
get to review impact of budget
freeze and make recommen-
dations to School Committee
on possible spending.
“As an educational leader, I
viewthedevelopment of abud-
get as a collaborative process,”
DeRuosi said. “As a high school
principal, I involvedstaff, unions
and stakeholders in the process
of creating a budget to be sub-
mitted to the superintendent
… As a superintendent, I have
maintained my practice of in-
clusion to involve those groups
mentioned … and to expand
it to include my principals and
directors, as well as the School
Committee and town officials.
… There is a danger in rush-
ing into decisions that have not
been thought out andvettedby
these stakeholders.”
CLOSE
| from page 4
“He [O’Regan] said all the
pumps were down,” the town
manager recalled Wednesday
night during his briefing of the
Finance Committee on articles
he has proposed for a Special
Town Meeting set for May 1.
The town came within two
hours of having to pump un-
treated wastewater directly into
the Saugus River – a situation
that could potentially result into
heavy fines because of an Ad-
ministrativeConsentOrder (ACO)
the town entered into with the
state Department of Environ-
mental Protection (DEP) in 2005,
which required the town to stop
the illegal dumping. Fortunate-
ly for the town, the DPW crews
were able to make enough re-
pairstoavoidhavingtodischarge
illegal wastewater into the river.
But one of the three pumps
at the Lincoln Avenue Pumping
Station remains out of commis-
sion, leaving the town in a very
precarious situation, according
toCrabtree andO’Regan.“This is
probably themost serious prob-
lemwefaceinthetown,”Crabtree
told the Finance Committee, ex-
plainingtheneedfor thetownto
borrow$4.3millionover thenext
four years to pay for capital im-
provementstoa35-year-oldsew-
er system that’s breaking down.
“We’re on two pumps right
now–andwealmost lostbothof
themtwomonthsago,”O’Regan
told the Finance Committee. If
those pumps fail, the DWP has
twotothreehoursof storageca-
pacity before it has todischarge
into the river, he added.
Article6–oneof sixarticles re-
ceiving a favorable recommen-
dation by the Finance Commit-
tee – drew a unanimous en-
dorsement from committee
members atWednesday night’s
meeting. The article requests
$4.3 million to be borrowed
fromthetown’s sewerenterprise
account,making it thebig ticket
item that will be considered by
Town Meeting members when
they meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday,
May1for theSpecialTownMeet-
ing in the second floor auditori-
um at Town Hall.
TheSpecialTownMeetingwill
occur on the same night that
the Annual Town Meeting Con-
venes. The Finance Committee
will decide when it meets again
next Wednesday (7 p.m., April
26) which of the articles it will
take upon the openingnight of
Town Meeting.
More than $7 million
SITUATION
| from page 1
SITUATION
| SEE PAGE 6