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THE SAUGUS ADVOCATE
– Friday, April 21, 2017
Page 9
Sale Dates: Friday, April 21 to
Thursday, April 27, 2017
We Have It All!
McKinnon’s Own – Family Pack
USDA Choice – 85% Lean
Seedless
McKinnon’s Own
McKinnon’s Own
Russer
Family Pack – Hot or Sweet
Land O Lakes – Presliced
Sweet & Juicy
Hatfield
Sargento
Ben & Jerry’s
24 Pack
Family Pack – Center Cut
McKinnon’s Best Beef
MARINATED SIRLOIN
STEAK TIPS
FRESH
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WATERMELON
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FRESH BREAKFAST
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HONEY HAM
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WHITE AMERICAN
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POLAND SPRING
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BONE IN
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70¢ lb.
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40¢ lb.
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$1.50 lb.
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$1.30 lb.
Sliced to
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Customer
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thatwouldalert police if themo-
tion-activated security camer-
as detect any after-dark activity.
“This is going to provide a
whole new level of security for
the police … The schools have
been asking for this for years,”
Crabtree said.
Jepson was the lone commit-
tee member opposing the ar-
ticle, saying “I’m not comfort-
able”because committeemem-
bersweren’tprovidedadetailed
breakdown of the costs. “We
want tospendahalf-milliondol-
lars on this and we got a blank
piece of paper to look at …We
shouldhave information in front
of us,”Jepson complained.
Finance Committee Chair-
man Kenneth DePatto said he
felt “comfortable,” noting that
he had heard the town manag-
er discuss the particulars of the
project previously.
Crabtreegavea fewestimates,
noting that lighting would cost
$179,000. He saidhewouldpro-
vide the committee a detailed
breakdown of the costs before
the Special Town Meeting. “We
reallydon’t knowwhat thecosts
are til it goes out to bid,” Crab-
tree said. He called it “a cleanup
of last year’s projects.”
Crabtree said he initiated Ar-
ticle 2 to transfer $500,000 out
of the“free cash account”to ad-
dress issues at other parks and
playgrounds that weren’t ad-
dressed last year. “I think we’ve
identified over a million dollars
in repairs …We can chip away
at this,” Crabtree told the com-
mittee. “Right now, we certainly
have some safety issues at these
parks andplaygrounds,”he said.
The town manager noted
the $500,000 would cover “all
the different issues that exist…
more repair and maintenance
issues in these parks that have
been neglected for decades.”
Crabtree said the focus would
be on“safety issues.”
“Anybody who has looked at
these parks knows they’re in
rough, rough shape,”he said.
Jepson, who was again con-
cerned about the lack of details
as to how the money would be
spent, voted against recom-
mending the article. Crabtree
didn’t provide a breakdown on
which parks and playgrounds
would get funded.
Six projects in one
Article 6 drew themost discus-
sion of Crabtree’s measures.With
thetownalreadyoperatingunder
consentordertostopdischarging
untreatedwastewaterintotheriv-
er while making improvements
in its sanitary sewer system, com-
mitteemembers agreed that im-
provements needed to be made
as soon as possible.
“There are a few stations in
Massachusetts like this,”DPWDi-
rector O’Regan said of the Lin-
coln Avenue Pumping Station
built in 1982.
“There are 19-plus valves that
needtobereplaced,”hesaid.The
project actually involved six dif-
ferent projects that needed to
be done over a four-year peri-
od, he added.
“It’sessentially theheartofour
wastewater system,” O’Regan
said of the Lincoln Avenue
Pumping Station.
Committeememberswanted
toknowwhether the capital im-
provements tothepumpingsta-
tionwould increase its capacity.
“This project allows the sta-
tion to move that wastewater
to Lynn,”O’Regan said.
The system was designed to
address sanitary sewer over-
flows and excessive Infiltration
and Inflow (I/I) – which were
the focusof theoriginal consent
order. On an average day, the
pumping station moves about
four million gallons of waste-
water, but the capacity is far
greater, according to O’Regan.
“We’ve had some storms where
wepumped in the15MGD [Mil-
lion Gallons during one Day, or
24 hours] range,”he said.
“It’s all about being more ef-
ficient … We’re trading clean
water for dirty water,” O’Regan
added.
The Massachusetts Water Re-
sources Authority noted that
about 50 percent of a munici-
pal system’s water flow is clean
water, according to the DPWdi-