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  • Malden High graduates 446 at Macdonald Stadium

    Friday, June 09, 2017 00:00
  • Residents in favor of RCN coming to city

    Friday, August 25, 2017 08:53
  • Sergio Cornelio unanimously appointed City Clerk

    Saturday, August 05, 2017 09:22
  • DeRuosi’s Report Card

    Friday, August 04, 2017 10:24
  • Help choose the next Malden Reads 2018 book selection!

    Friday, June 09, 2017 00:00

News

Meet the 2017 PHS Field Hockey Team

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Six new Police Officers sworn-in

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Lady Blues Softball Team crowned 2017 City of Peabody Women’s Softball Champions

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The champions: back row, from left to right: head coach Karin Bettencourt, Nicole Grafton, Bridget Giarusso, Kristen Cunningham, Lisa Leavitt, Julie Broughton, assistant coach Gabby Vitale, Michelle Grifoni and assistant coach Vin Grifoni; front row, same order: Katie Bettencourt, Kenia McKeon, Krista MacKenzie, Elaine Linehan, Maria Nazzaro and Julie Solovicos.           (courtesy photo)


   

Beacon Hill Roll Call

THE HOUSE AND SENATE: Beacon Hill Roll Call records local representatives’ and senators’ votes on several of the roll calls on overriding some of Gov. Charlie Baker’s cuts of $320 million in spending in the $39.4 billion fiscal 2018 state budget. A two-thirds vote in both branches is needed for a veto to be overridden. The House has so far restored an estimated $284 million and the Senate $24.9 million.

House and Senate Democratic leaders said the budget was balanced and that Baker’s cuts were unnecessary and would hurt many people including the sick, seniors, children and minorities.

The governor and GOP leaders said the Legislature should wait until more tax revenue figures are in so that members can see if the state can afford to restore this funding. Some Republicans said that because of this uncertainty they voted to sustain all of Gov. Baker’s vetoes, even though it meant voting against restoring funding for many good programs they would otherwise have supported.

“The Baker-Polito Administration put forward a balanced budget, eliminated millions of dollars in earmark spending and increased funding for education, addiction prevention initiatives and other key programs this fiscal year,” said Baker spokesman Brendan Moss. “The current fiscal environment, specifically soft revenue collection reports to date, indicates there is no basis to support the legislature’s decision to increase spending by $284 million.”

“The Senate has carefully reviewed vetoes in the context of our difficult fiscal situation and ongoing efforts on health care cost containment,” said Senate Ways and Means chair Karen Spilka (D-Ashland). “I am confident that the budget remains in balance and cautiously optimistic about revenue collections and potential savings moving forward.”

CUT $1.1 MILLION FOR RECOVERY HIGH SCHOOLS (H 3800)

House 139-15, overrode a reduction of $1.1 million (from $3.6 million to $2.5 million) for recovery high schools — public schools where students can earn a high school diploma and are supported in their recovery from alcohol and drug use.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $1.1 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Rep. Theodore Speliotis                Yes

Rep. Thomas Walsh         Yes

CUT $550,000 FOR PROMOTION OF HEALTH AND DISEASE PREVENTION (H 3800)

House 125-28, overrode a reduction of $550,000 (from $4,110,977 to $3,560,977) for programs for the promotion of health and disease prevention including prevention of breast cancer, hepatitis C and colorectal cancer; and screening for prostate cancer, diabetes, ovarian cancer, multiple sclerosis and osteoporosis.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $550,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Rep. Theodore Speliotis                Yes

Rep. Thomas Walsh         Yes

CUT ENTIRE $60,000 FOR TEACHING FINANCIAL LITERACY (H 3800)

House 120-33, overrode the veto of the entire $60,000 for a program that mentors and teaches financial literacy to low-income women.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $60,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Rep. Theodore Speliotis                Yes

Rep. Thomas Walsh         Yes

CUT ENTIRE $50,000 FOR POST-PARTUM DEPRESSION (H 3800)

House 141-12 overrode the veto of the entire $50,000 for a post-partum depression pilot program.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $50,000. A “No” is against funding it.)

Rep. Theodore Speliotis                Yes

Rep. Thomas Walsh         Yes

CUT ENTIRE $250,000 FOR CHEFS IN SCHOOL (H 3800)

House 136-17, overrode the veto of the entire $250,000 for the Chefs in Schools program that brings chefs into school cafeteria kitchens to work with existing staff to create healthier meals that students would find tasty and visually appealing.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $250,000. A “No” is against funding it.)

Rep. Theodore Speliotis                Yes

Rep. Thomas Walsh         Yes

CUT $1.25 MILLION FOR KIDS’ MENTAL HEALTH (H 3800)

Senate 31-5, overrode a reduction of $1.25 million (from $2.5 million to $1.25 million) for early childhood mental health consultation services in early education and care programs.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $1.25 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Sen. Joan Lovely               Yes

CUT $800,000 FOR PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE (H 3800)

Senate 37-0, overrode a reduction of $800,000 (from $2,606,334 to 1,806,334) for pediatric palliative care.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $800,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Sen. Joan Lovely               Yes

CUT $200,000 FOR SAMARITANS (H 3800)

Senate 34-2, overrode a reduction of $200,000 (from $400,000 to $200,000) for the Samaritans for suicide prevention services.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $200,000. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Sen. Joan Lovely               Yes

CUT ENTIRE $1 MILLION FOR REACH OUT AND READ PROGRAM PROGRAMS (H 3800)

Senate 31-5, overrode Gov. Baker’s veto of the entire $1 million in funding for the Reach Out and Read (ROAR) program that trains pediatricians and nurses to advise parents about the importance of reading aloud to their children to prepare them for school. The program also funds the purchase of books to give to children who are six months to five years old during their visits to their doctors. Some 254 hospitals and clinics in Massachusetts participate in the program, serving 186,000 children and families.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $1 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Sen. Joan Lovely               Yes

$1 MILLION FOR TUFTS VETERINARY SCHOOL (H 3800)

Senate 30-6, overrode Gov. Baker’s $1 million veto reduction (from $5 million to $4 million) in funding for Tufts Veterinary School in North Grafton. Tufts is the only veterinary school in New England.

Tufts’ website says that its progressive academic programs, high-quality clinical care services and original research have brought them national and worldwide acclaim.

(A “Yes” vote is for funding the $1 million. A “No” vote is against funding it.)

Sen. Joan Lovely               Yes

HOW LONG WAS LAST WEEK’S SESSION? Beacon Hill Roll Call tracks the length of time that the House and Senate were in session each week. Many legislators say that legislative sessions are only one aspect of the Legislature’s job and that a lot of important work is done outside of the House and Senate chambers. They note that their jobs also involve committee work, research, constituent work and other matters that are important to their districts. Critics say that the Legislature does not meet regularly or long enough to debate and vote in public view on the thousands of pieces of legislation that have been filed. They note that the infrequency and brief length of sessions are misguided and lead to irresponsible late-night sessions and a mad rush to act on dozens of bills in the days immediately preceding the end of an annual session.

During the week of September 25-29, the House met for a total of six hours and five minutes while the Senate met for a total of five hours and 38 minutes.

Mon. Sept. 25 House 11:02 a.m. to 11:12 a.m.

Senate 11:03 a.m. to 11:13 a.m.

Tues. Sept. 26 No House session             No Senate session

Wed. Sept. 27 House 11:04 a.m. to 3:58 p.m.        No Senate session

Thurs. Sept. 28 House 11:08 a.m. to 12:09 p.m.

Senate 11:11 a.m. to 4:39 p.m.

Fri. Sept. 29 No House session No Senate session

Bob Katzen welcomes feedback at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

Make Fall Comfort Foods with More Nutrition and Fewer Calories

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Comforting Fall dishes like stews, soups, chilies and casseroles can be high in fat and calories and not waist friendly. Luckily, by a slight tweaking of ingredients can change all that. Here I have a guide to make heart warming delicious dishes that help weight management, provide healthful benefits and are simple to cook up.

Begin your meal creation with a plan that includes not more than 1/3 poultry, fish, red meat and low fat dairy. The other 2/3 of your meal should be whole grains, vegetables, fruit, beans and other plant food. The combination of plant foods provides plenty of health promoting phytochemicals and fewer calories to your fall comfort dishes. Here are 4 steps to a delicious slimming and healthful fall repast.

1. Choose Lean Protein Sources

Some of the most healthful protein sources are beans, peas, and lentils. These low cost legumes provide fiber, folate, potassium, magnesium and iron. As they are a plant food, they contain phytochemicals.

• Choose canned or dry and cook them yourself

• Use beans in chilis

• Substitute lentils for ground beef in pasta dishes or stuffed peppers.

• Choose skinless poultry, shrimp, fish and low fat cottage cheese for animal sources avoid extra calories and saturated fats.

2. Get your veggies

Seasonal fall vegetables at peak flavor include Swiss chard, winter, squashes, turnip, sweet potatoes, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and mushrooms. Mix several types of your favorite vegetables together for stews or stir-fries. Frozen vegetables are always handy and ready to be used as needed.

3. Add Whole Grains

There are many common whole grains to choose, such as, whole-wheat pasta, brown rice and barley. Or look for varieties like quinoa, wheat berries and farro.

Whole grains offer cancer-fighting vitamins minerals, fiber, antioxidant, and phytochemical. Rice, small pasta shapes, barley and other small whole grains cook up nicely in a stew or skillet dish. Just add some extra liquid in the form of water, broth, and tomato sauce or vegetable juice. Depending on your recipe, some grains like larger noodles and wheat berries will need pre-cooking. Add them to your one pot meal at the end of cooking.

4. Toss–Together Meal

Sometimes you have what you need already cooked and read to assemble. Prepare a nourishing bowl with leftover brown rice topped with chicken or shrimp and steamed broccoli or cauliflower.

Make your one pot meal a fall staple. Full of healthful benefits and easy to put together. Most one-pot meals taste better the next day, so they can be cooked ahead and reheated as needed. Keep the nutrients up and the calories down for a slimmer waist and better overall health.

Anna Tourkakis is a nutritionist, author and founder of Eating From Within Nutrition. She provides nutrition advisory services and healthy eating programs to companies and individuals to help clients manage health conditions and maintain healthy eating lifestyles. Anna can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it T. 781 334-8752; www.eatingfromwithin.com


   

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