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News

PHS Field Hockey Senior Night

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Tanners field hockey team closes season with dual victories

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Having been competitive all year with several close, one-goal defeats, the Peabody High School field hockey team concluded the season on a memorable note with back-to-back victories last week. The Tanners blanked Revere, 2-0, in their Senior Night game on Oct. 26, and scored a 9-1 road win over Malden two days later. With the wins, Peabody finished 6-10-2 on the season but fell short of a playoff berth.

“It was a really good win for all the seniors,” said head coach Pam Grant after the Senior Night win. “It was a great day for them. The seniors all worked hard and the team began to connect and work well together.”

Emily Bellavance celebrated Senior Night in fashion by notching both Tanner goals against Revere. The first came off a scramble in front with 5:20 left in the first half. The second was very similar as Bellanvance again poked one in off a rebound with just over 14 minutes to go in the game. Mallory Leblanc assisted on the first score.

Seniors Bellavance, Caroline O’Neill, Taylor Colella, Katarina Bettencourt, Emily Bouchard, Gianna DeNisco, Sara Feinstein, Collen Guiney and Alyssa Lake were recognized during a pre-game ceremony. Grant also credited Feinstein for her defense and O’Neill for her midfield play.

Nine different players collected goals in a 9-1 pasting of Malden on Oct. 28. DeNisco, Hailee Monies, Bellavance, Leblanc, Nicole Ferrante, Bouchard, O’Neill, and Ashlyn Fitzgerald hit pay dirt for the Tanners.

Goalie Sofia Rodriguez, who earned both wins, made several tough stops in a tight 3-2 defeat at Beverly on Oct. 25. Ferrante scored twice off assists from Leblanc. The game was tied 2-2 before Beverly notched a second-half tally to grab the win.

By Greg Phipps


 

Dogs Decked Out for Halloween Parade through Sunrise Senior Living

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Residents of Sunrise Senior Living on Margin Street celebrated Halloween with a costumed canine parade. This was the second year that the small dogs from Lynn’s dog park and their owners paraded their pups through the living room to the delight of approximately 25 residents. This year, family members of some of the residents dressed their dogs and joined in the festivities.

Dogs sporting a variety of costumes — Dracula, Supergirl, cowboy, lobster, ice cream, inmate, crossing guard, devil — were on their best behavior, stopping only for a pat on the head or a scratch behind the ears. “Sunrise truly sees the value that pet therapy has for our seniors,” Executive Director Katie Palamara said, “and they look forward to many more years of doggy parades.”

Sunrise residents voted for the three dogs with the best costumes. First prize went to Ginger the Labradoodle (aka Supergirl), “granddog” of resident Sally Angelli. Chanel, a Morkie who sported a blonde wig and pantsuit à la Hillary Clinton, made owner Lisa Brinkley of Lynn proud for her second-place prize. Bella, a rat terrier owned by Michael Cotter of Lynn, took third prize as a sailor.

Dog park pet owners passed out vintage candy treats to the residents, while Sunrise staff members offered appetizers to all. The dogs, of course, had doggy bags.

By Pam Wehbi


   

Best. Costumes. Ever.

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These very imaginative and sports-minded students of Bishop Fenwick High School took their Halloween costumes to the next level as they dressed as their favorite sports trophies. Shown from left to right, are; Abbey Rocker, Gianna Capo, Hannah Durkin, Emily Charette, Rachel Cambria, Francesca Lanza, Lindsay Haley, Mary Gerdencih, Jessie Silvagni, Emily Smith, Sam Gulla, and Ally Charrette.  (Courtesy photo)


 

Eating From Within Nutrition Benefits of Whole-Grains

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Often times when trying to lose weight, mistakenly, dieters think that carbohydrates or grain products must be avoided. That is not true.  Consuming carbohydrates made with whole grain is key.  Wheat is the most well known of the grains used to make flour containing products.   Rice, rye, barley, and oats are also grains. Foods made with whole grain are nutritionally of higher quality than those made with refined grains.

Whole grain is grain and grain products made from the entire grain seed, usually called the kernel, (see fig. 1) which consists of three areas: the bran, germ and the endosperm. The endosperm area contains the starch associated with carbohydrates along with B vitamins and some protein.  The germ area is rich in vitamins and minerals and contains some oil. The bran, containing much fiber and other nutrients, covers and protects the endosperm and germ.  Most grains undergo some type of processing or milling after harvesting to allow them to cook more quickly and easily. Processing steps may include removing the bran and the germ from the endosperm of the wheat kernel and further milling as in white flour, cracking the grain as in cracked wheat or bulgur wheat or rolling and slightly steaming the grain as in rolled oats to shorten the cooking time.

A grain is called a wholegrain whenever the fiber-rich bran and the vitamin-rich germ are left with the endosperm of a grain. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat berries, bulgur, whole-wheat flour, whole rye, and whole rolled oats, whole cornmeal, whole hulled barley, popcorn, brown rice and wild rice. More exotic whole grains include amaranth, millet, and quinoa.

If the bran and germ are removed from the endosperm, the grain is called a refined grain. Whereas whole wheat flour is made from the whole grain. White flour also called wheat flour is made only from the endosperm of the wheat kernel.

When you compare the nutrients in whole grains and refined grains, whole grains are always a far more superior and nutritious choice. When wheat is refined, over 20 nutrients and most of the fiber are removed. Federal law requires refined grains to add back or enrich the milled flour with five nutrients that are lost in processing: thiamin riboflavin, niacin, folate, and iron. Despite this requirement white flour is less nutritious than its whole wheat counterpart.  With whole wheat you get more vitamin E, vitamin B6, magnesium, copper, and, of course, fiber. Whole-grain foods also contain phytochemicals, substances in plants that have health – promoting properties.

At the supermarket read the Nutrition Fact label for the amount of fiber per serving.   Wholegrain products should contain about 2 grams of fiber per serving or 2 grams of fiber per 20 grams of carbohydrates.

For your daily meals choose whole grain cereals for breakfast; make a sandwich at lunch with 100% whole wheat bread; if snacking make it   whole grain crackers or 1-2 cups of popcorn – no butter; with dinner   choose brown rice or whole wheat pasta. Also, consider quinoa or barley of the lesser familiar grains. Keep whole grain carbohydrates in the diet, decrease the refined ones and you may just see a downward trend in your weight.

Warm Quinoa and Walnut Salad

Makes 8 servings

1 cup regular or red quinoa

2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth

2 cups (10 oz.) frozen shelled edamame

2 Tbsp. fresh tarragon, chopped (2 tsp. dried)

1 Tbsp. lemon zest, freshly grated

3 Tbsp. olive oil

3 Tbsp. lemon juice

3/4 cup jarred roasted red peppers, drained and coarsely chopped

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 pkg. (5 oz.) baby spinach

1/4 - 1/3 cup chopped walnuts

In large strainer, rinse quinoa well.

In large pot over medium heat, toast quinoa until it starts to crackle, about 5 minutes. Add broth and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and gently simmer for 12 minutes. Add edamame on top of quinoa. Do not stir or disturb quinoa. Cover again and continue cooking for 10 minutes or until edamame is tender. Carefully drain any remaining liquid. Set aside and let stand for 15 minutes.

In large mixing bowl, add tarragon, zest, olive oil and juice. Gently stir to combine. Reserve 2 tablespoons. Add red peppers and quinoa mixture and toss to combine well. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

In another large mixing bowl, gently toss spinach with reserved dressing.

Evenly divide spinach among eight plates and top with quinoa mixture. Garnish salad with walnuts and serve.

Makes 8 Servings.

Per serving: 270 calories, 14 g total fat (1.5 g saturated fat), 30 g carbohydrate,

10 g protein, 6 g dietary fiber, 150 mg sodium.

Anna Tourkakis is a nutritional consultant and founder of Eating From Within Nutrition, and can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


   

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