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News

Siemens welcomes Connell as Senior Project Manager

Siemens Industry, Inc. recently announced that Joseph Connell has joined the Boston branch of its Building Technologies division as a senior project manager. His responsibilities in this position include overall planning, forecasting, executing and leading large projects in and around Boston and Cambridge.

“Bringing his breadth of knowledge and experience within the security industry, Joe is a real asset to our division and our clients,” said Jaime Paris Boisvert, general manager of the Boston branch of Siemens USA’s Building Technologies Division. “He shares our dedication to excellence and innovation, and we are thrilled to have him on board.”

Prior to joining Siemens, Connell was most recently regional operations manager for Stanley Black & Decker, where he managed the day-to-day field business of the branch leadership teams within New England and Upstate New York. Prior to that, Connell served as senior security operations manager for Allied Barton Security Services. He also served in the United States Air Force.

Connell received his bachelor’s degree from Norwich University, a master’s degree in public administration from Central Michigan University and a second master’s degree in national security fellowship strategic studies from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. He has also received several military recognitions, including the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and the Iraq and Afghanistan Combat Service Medals.

Outside of the office, Connell serves as co-chairman for Town of Lynnfield’s War Memorial Committee and he is active with Lynnfield Youth Lacrosse. Connell is also a member of the Elks, VFW, Knights of Columbus and AMVET’s.

The Boston branch of the Building Technologies Division is headquartered in Canton, Mass., with additional locations in the Seaport, Auburndale and New Bedford, Mass., and in Cranston, R.I.

 

Best Buddies run and walk slated for Oct. 1

About 400 North Shore residents are expected to welcome the month of October with the Third Annual Best Buddies Friendship 5K and Walk at MarketStreet Lynnfield. Scheduled for Oct. 1 at 9 a.m., the event will benefit Best Buddies Massachusetts, a nonprofit organization designed to “create opportunities for one-to-one friendships and integrate employment and leadership development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

MarketStreet spokesmen Alexandra Sullivan and Christopher Langley said the 5K road race will take runners around “historic Lynnfield” while the one-mile walk will take place at MarketStreet. “Following the run and walk, the party continues with a celebration on the MarketStreet Green, featuring a DJ, live entertainment, games and giveaways,” said Sullivan and Langley. “This event is family- and dog-friendly and a fun opportunity to support the full inclusion of people of all abilities.”

Prior to the run and walk, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse will donate 20 percent of its sales from Buffalo Spring Rolls to honor Michael Jaxtimer Barry, who is one of four Best Buddies currently working at the restaurant.

Sullivan and Langley said Wahlburger’s has agreed to open at 10:30 a.m., an hour-and-a-half early, and will donate 20 percent of all sales to Best Buddies until 8 p.m. Sullivan and Langley also said that anyone who registers for the run and walk will receive an automatic shopping discount at MarketStreet for the remainder of the day.

Registration is required for the event and participants are asked to arrive at 7:30 a.m.

According to the organization’s website, bestbuddies.org, Best Buddies was established in 1989 by Boston native Anthony Shriver, who was just 24 years old at the time. Since then it has become a “vibrant organization that has grown from one original chapter to more than 2,300 middle school, high school and college chapters worldwide.” The organization features eight programs geared for students, residents, the workforce, ambassadors and promoters. Best Buddies has a reach of 1.1 million people throughout the United States and in 50 other countries. Research has shown that by participating in Best Buddies, individuals with IDD go on to be employed at reputable companies and are also able to live on their own. The organization presently has 165 school-based friendship programs in Massachusetts and assists 115 adults with job prospects.

By Christopher Roberson


 

Best Buddies run and walk slated for Oct. 1

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About 400 North Shore residents are expected to welcome the month of October with the Third Annual Best Buddies Friendship 5K and Walk at MarketStreet Lynnfield. Scheduled for Oct. 1 at 9 a.m., the event will benefit Best Buddies Massachusetts, a nonprofit organization designed to “create opportunities for one-to-one friendships and integrate employment and leadership development for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

MarketStreet spokesmen Alexandra Sullivan and Christopher Langley said the 5K road race will take runners around “historic Lynnfield” while the one-mile walk will take place at MarketStreet. “Following the run and walk, the party continues with a celebration on the MarketStreet Green, featuring a DJ, live entertainment, games and giveaways,” said Sullivan and Langley. “This event is family- and dog-friendly and a fun opportunity to support the full inclusion of people of all abilities.”

Prior to the run and walk, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse will donate 20 percent of its sales from Buffalo Spring Rolls to honor Michael Jaxtimer Barry, who is one of four Best Buddies currently working at the restaurant.

Sullivan and Langley said Wahlburger’s has agreed to open at 10:30 a.m., an hour-and-a-half early, and will donate 20 percent of all sales to Best Buddies until 8 p.m. Sullivan and Langley also said that anyone who registers for the run and walk will receive an automatic shopping discount at MarketStreet for the remainder of the day.

Registration is required for the event and participants are asked to arrive at 7:30 a.m.

According to the organization’s website, bestbuddies.org, Best Buddies was established in 1989 by Boston native Anthony Shriver, who was just 24 years old at the time. Since then it has become a “vibrant organization that has grown from one original chapter to more than 2,300 middle school, high school and college chapters worldwide.” The organization features eight programs geared for students, residents, the workforce, ambassadors and promoters. Best Buddies has a reach of 1.1 million people throughout the United States and in 50 other countries. Research has shown that by participating in Best Buddies, individuals with IDD go on to be employed at reputable companies and are also able to live on their own. The organization presently has 165 school-based friendship programs in Massachusetts and assists 115 adults with job prospects.

By Christopher Roberson


   

Lynnfield history: tragic farmhouse fire in Lynnfield, 1940

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“It was a beautiful but windy day Sunday, Sept. 23, 1940.”

Thus begins a reflection of Rhoda Strong Buttrick years later in the 1997 Lynnfield Town Report. Built in 1800, the farmhouse at 120 Main St., where the Strong family lived, had three stories and 12 rooms. Anson and Ethel Strong had three children: Rhoda, Mason and Burton. Attached to the house was a two-story ell occupied by William and Edith Bezanson and their four children: Howard, Jimmy, Billy and baby Paulie. William Bezanson worked the farm with Mr. Strong.

The conflagration

That fateful day 21-year-old Rhoda Strong, her brother Burton and the three Bezanson boys had gone on a mountain-climbing trip to Mt. Monadnock with their neighbor Herbert Buttrick. In the early afternoon Mason Strong was on the third floor giving a trumpet lesson to a Bezanson nephew when he smelled smoke. Discovering that the hallway was impassable, he dropped the boy from a window onto the roof of the ell. From there they both jumped to the ground. Mason was preparing to enter Tufts College that fall.

Meanwhile in the ell, Mrs. Bezanson had also smelled smoke and rushed to save her 14-month-old daughter, Paulie, who was sleeping in a back room. She then alerted Mrs. Strong in the main house. The flames were gaining momentum. Mrs. Strong shouted to her stepmother, Mrs. Cora Wyman, who was visiting from Maine. She had been resting on the second floor of the main house. Mrs. Strong and a passerby, Robert Davis, who also lived on Main Street, attempted to rescue Mrs. Wyman but were repulsed by the heat and flames.

The 74-year-old Mrs. Wyman was hard of hearing and might not have heard their initial warnings. A newspaper account of the time records: “Mrs. Wyman’s body, burned beyond recognition, was not discovered until late. She was buried under piles of debris, including part of the collapsed roof. When found, she was face down on the floor and had a sum of money clutched in one of her hands.”

Help arrives

Presently, George Forrest and Christopher Sullivan of Wakefield also discovered the fire. They “drove at mile-a-minute speed to the location of Box 46 at the corner of Lowell and Vernon Streets and sounded the alarm.” The two then rushed back to the Lynnfield Center Fire Station, where men had just been alerted about the blaze. Returning to the scene, Sullivan made a desperate attempt to reach Mrs. Wyman. But “he was halted by a hot air explosion which hurled him to the foot of the stairs.” Knocked unconscious, he was removed to the lower field, where he was given first aid.

A Wakefield call fireman “narrowly escaped serious injury when a ventilator fell from the roof just before it collapsed and came within inches of landing on his head as he jumped from the sixth rung of a ladder placed against the north side of the house.”

Fire crews also responded from South Lynnfield, Wakefield and Reading. Lynnfield’s new water system had not been fully installed. Water pressure (even when connected to the Wakefield supply at the town line) was insufficient to contain the blaze. The unrelenting northwest wind continued to drive the inferno. The Bezanson family was able to save only a few articles from the ell, including a piano and a bowl of goldfish. The barn was untouched.

As the fire subsided, a few neighbors “procured baskets and picked several bushels of squash” in the nearby fields. Rhoda and her companions heard about the fire when they returned from New Hampshire later that day.

Things change

The farm was sold shortly after the tragedy. Route 128 would cut through the homestead in the 1950s. Only the two stone pillars from the original gate at 120 Main St. remained according to Rhoda’s 1997 account. The 32-acre Strong Farm was developed into Edwards Avenue, North & South. The next door farm, where Herbert Buttrick lived later, became New Meadow and Olde Towne Roads. Traces of old stone walls can still be found throughout these neighborhoods.

Rhoda married Herb Buttrick the following summer (1941). They settled in Lynnfield, raised four daughters and were active in civic organizations, including the Lynnfield Historical Society. Rhoda died in 2007 at the age of 88.

(Sources: 1997 Lynnfield Town Report and ancestry.com.)

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By Helen Breen


 

Quinstance and Skeleton Key owners excited for MarketStreet openings

Erin Sandler, owner of Quinstance, has her sights set on opening a second location for her business at MarketStreet Lynnfield within the next month.

Currently located in Burlington, Quinstance will be moving into the space at 678 Market St.

“Customers can expect one-of-a-kind items from glassblowers, woodworkers, jewelry designers, letterpresses, soap makers and seamstresses,” said MarketStreet spokesmen Alexandra Sullivan and Kelsey Bruun in a previously written statement.

Sandler said she is looking forward to experiencing MarketStreet as a tenant rather than as a customer.

“I have been there many times as a shopper and I’ve always had a good experience,” she said. “The vibe and the energy there are just incredible, I hope we can both benefit from that and add to it.”

Sandler also said the new store will be larger than her original location.

“One of the additions at our Lynnfield store will be a maker space where we can host workshops and classes,” she said, adding that she will also have space available for local artists that they can rent by the hour. “We’ve heard from a number of local Etsy shop owners, for example, that they’re outgrowing their garage or dining table and we wanted to provide a space where they can create and collaborate. I’m thrilled that we will be able to offer this new opportunity.”

With an inventory that runs the gamut from stationery and jewelry to home goods, soaps and cosmetics, Sandler said 90 percent of her products are made in the United States. Within that grouping, 10 percent of her products are created by artists throughout New England.

Sandler said the balance of her product line is obtained through fair trade partnerships around the world.

“We support developing communities in India, Ghana, Bangladesh and Cambodia,” she said.

Raymond Weaver, owner of Skeleton Key, said his location at 663 Market St. is scheduled to open in November.

“The layout is great, the customers are great, it’s very lively,” he said, adding that he also owns Muse Paintbar, which is currently open at MarketStreet.

Weaver said the new location will be Skeleton Key’s first store as his location in Watertown is used for administrative purposes.

The new Skeleton Key will bring a bit of a twist to Lynnfield’s outdoor mall.

The company will provide patrons with an “adventure experience” in which they must work together to navigate a series of rooms and escape within the allotted time of 60 minutes.

“The space will also include The Adventure Emporium; a bar and lounge serving craft cocktails beer, wine and light snacks, where guests can unwind after the heart-pumping action,” said Sullivan and Bruun.

Weaver said there will be three games available at the Lynnfield store.

“The games are going to be fantastic, we have a clever use of technology,” he said.

Other businesses coming to MarketStreet by the end of the year include Fit Revolution and Neem Medical Spa.

By Christopher Roberson


   

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